11 Feb

HOW TO GET A FREE COPY OF YOUR CREDIT BUREAU

General

Posted by: Nicole Wilford

Think of your credit score as a report card on how you’ve handled your finances in the past. A credit score is a number that lenders use to determine the risk of lending money to a given borrower.

There is always someone willing to lend you money however, higher risk = higher rates!

Step 1 for good credit – you need to know your credit history
• In Canada there are 2 credit bureaus – Equifax and TransUnion.
• You can receive a FREE copy of your credit report from both Equifax Canada and TransUnion Canada once a year
• You can pay Equifax or TransUnion for a digital copy, which is much faster, BUT you have to pay, which sucks.

I recommend you order a copy of your credit report from both Equifax Canada and TransUnion Canada, since each credit bureau may have different information about how you have used credit in the past.

Ordering your own credit report has no effect on your credit score.
• Equifax Canada refers to your credit report as “credit file disclosure”.
• TransUnion Canada refers to your credit report as “consumer disclosure”.

Once you have obtained your free credit report, check it for errors:
• Are there any late payments that have been erroneously attributed to your credit history?
• Are the amounts owing in your credit report accurate?
• Is there anything missing on your credit bureau
o Sometimes the credit bureau has more that one file with your name, which can be merged, but it takes time.

If you find any errors on your credit report, you need to dispute them with your credit bureau.

How can I get a copy of my credit report and credit score?

There are two national credit bureaus in Canada: Equifax Canada and TransUnion Canada. You should check with both bureaus.

Credit scores run from 300 to 900. The higher the number, the greater the likelihood a request for credit will be approved.

The “free-report-by-mail” links are not prominently displayed, since credit bureaus would love to sell you instant access to your report and credit score online.

Equifax, the instructions to get a free credit report by mail are available here.

For TransUnion, the instructions to get a free credit report by mail are available here.

The bottom line: when it comes to financing your life, through credit cards, mortgages, car loans or any other kind of debt – your credit score has a BIG impact on what kind of terms you can negotiate.

Keeping an eye on your credit score is important — if there’s a problem or an error, you want to know and have time to fix it before you apply for a loan. If you have any questions, contact a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional near you.

Kelly Hudson

KELLY HUDSON

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Kelly is part of DLC Canadian Mortgage Experts based in Richmond, BC

17 Jan

5 C’S OF CREDIT TO GET A MORTGAGE

General

Posted by: Nicole Wilford

Whether you are buying your first home or have been a home owner for years, when you are looking at purchasing a property, finding the best mortgage solution for your specific situation can be an intimidating experience.

Working with a licenced mortgage broker will ease that tension, along with knowing the basics of what lenders are looking for will help you better understand the process.

The Five C’s of Credit/Mortgages
The five Cs of credit is a system used by lenders to gauge the creditworthiness of potential borrowers. The system weighs five characteristics of the borrower and conditions of the mortgage, attempting to estimate the chance of default and, consequently, the risk of a financial loss for the lender.

Higher Risk = Higher Rates!

Know Your 5 C’s:

Every client has individual mortgage needs when buying a home and my goal is to find a mortgage loan that’s right fit for your situation! The first step in getting the mortgage process started involves understanding what lenders are looking for in order to get mortgage approval.

The approval process is called the Five C’s of Credit and they consist of:
• Collateral– the property that you are planning to purchase
• Credit – do you have good credit? Do you have a good history of repayment for all loans?
• Capacity – Proof of being able to pay for your mortgage with your provable income
• Capital – How much equity do you have in the property? The borrower’s net worth
• Character – The borrower’s willingness to repay the loan and their reliability

1. Collateral
Collateral reflects the strength of the property itself. Lenders look at if the property is owner occupied (do you live there) or is it a rental dwelling? Is the property a home, condominium or cottage? Is the property located in a metropolitan neighbourhood or a rural area? Is there a single family living in the home or multiple families? All these factors are considered by the lender for marketability when rating your property. An appraisal is one of the tools that will be used to assess the value of the property.

2. Credit
Shows the lender a snapshot of what the borrower’s repayment history has been over a period of time. This is the only way a lender can predict the borrower’s propensity to make future payments. The credit score (also called credit history, credit report, credit rating) is the primary measurement factor.
When you borrow money, your repayment history is reported to the credit bureau – this rating is called your credit score. How do you pay your bills – always on time or sometimes a few days late or not at all, will determine what type of credit rating will apply. Some other factors that affect your credit rating are if your credit card balance is greater than 25-50% of your credit limit, if any accounts have gone to collection, or if there have been multiple inquiries into your credit.

3. Capacity

The most important by far! How are you going to pay for your mortgage? The lender’s main concern is how you intend to repay your mortgage and will consider your income (from all sources) against your monthly expenses. Proof of income will differ depending on your employment status: salaried, commissioned, self-employed, full time, or part time. Lenders will determine what types of documents are required to confirm your provable income and how much mortgage you can qualify for. This is represented as TDS Total Debt Service Ratio and GDS Gross Debt Service Ratio.

4. Capital
Capital refers to your personal net worth and how much equity you have in the property. Where is your down payment coming from? In Canada your minimum down payment is 5% for a “high ratio” insured mortgage* or a “conventional” mortgage with 20% down. The downpayment money can come from your own resources or can be gifted from a family member.

5. Character
Character is a subjective rating and basically reflects a combination of the above four factors. Your character tells a story to the lender about your individual situation. Lenders want to know that as a borrower, that you are trustworthy and will meet your payment obligations to them. Lenders will take factors such as length of employment, your tendency to save and use credit responsibly to establish your character and determine whether you are a borrower that they can trust with their mortgage.

The goal is to get a yes with your lender. The Five C’s of credit outlined above determine a borrower’s ability and willingness to make payments. Understanding what a lender is looking for allows you to set yourself up to put your best foot forward.

There you have it – the 5 C’s that lenders analyze when reviewing a mortgage application.

If you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional, they’re here to help!

Kelly Hudson

KELLY HUDSON

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Kelly is part of DLC Canadian Mortgage Experts based in Richmond, BC

6 Nov

NO NEED TO PANIC AFTER RATE INCREASE

General

Posted by: Nicole Wilford

You may have already seen the more technical BANK OF CANADA RATE ANNOUNCEMENT on October 24th, or you may not have. The Coles Notes (the simplest version) are as such:

  • Global economy remains strong, the USMCA will reduce trading uncertainty
  • Canadian economy is balanced for the foreseeable 2 years
  • Household spending will increase, but backed by income growth
  • Housing activity across Canada is stabilizing

 

On October 24th the Bank of Canada did what we all expected, they increased the Overnight lending rate by 0.25% to 1.75%. This equated to a PRIME being increased by 0.25% to 3.95%. All variable rate mortgages and lines of credit utilize PRIME to calculate the current interest rate.

Now the BIG QUESTION, how do we as mortgage consumers respond? First, ask your Dominion Lending Centres mortgage broker how they plan to react in accordance to his own financing.

No need to ask me, I will tell you. Variable, with no hesitation. I will stay the course by not pushing the panic button.

WHY?

Because if I decide to move, re-finance, consolidate, leverage equity or to simply break the mortgage for any reason my penalty will only be 3 months interest. I also need to consider how much money I have saved over the term by utilizing a variable rate mortgage rather than a fixed. During my current mortgage the spread between variable and fixed is approximately 1%.

Please excuse the following ‘tongue & cheek…’To go with a fixed mortgage tells me that you can predict the future with absolute certainty.

I know I can’t, so I rely on statistics. 65% of all fixed mortgage consumers will break their mortgage in 33 months, the penalty that follows is unavoidable. For the average B.C. mortgage of $350,000 the penalty is approximately $14,000. By opting for a fixed rate mortgage, you have declared to the universe that there is a zero percent chance you will need to access equity, amend the current mortgage or consider applying for a secured line of credit.

Real estate wealth is a long game, building net worth doesn’t happen overnight. Gains are not made in the short term. Just like other markets (stocks, bonds, mutuals, GICs RRSPs), there will be highs and lows.

What does this increase mean?

Dollarize it for your own personal consumption. For an increase of 0.25% the payment will go up $13 per every $100,000 borrowed. For some variable rate borrowers, the payment hasn’t even changed as the lender only adjusts the principal and interest allocation.

Now the question becomes, what do you do? Remain with variable or lock into a fixed. I recommend staying the course.

Michael Hallett

MICHAEL HALLETT

Dominion Lending Centres – Accredited Mortgage Professional
Michael is part of DLC Producers West Financial based in Coquitlam, BC.

21 Mar

New Goverment Mortgage Rules in affect now

General

Posted by: Nicole Wilford

The new goverment rules for mortagages have come into affect as of March 18th. The rule for the maximum ammortization to 30 years affects high ratio mortgages – that means anyone buying a house with less than 20% down payment. Some of the lenders have also changed this for conventional mortgages (20% or more of a down payment), however, there are some lenders that are still offering 35 years as well as 40 years! With 20% or more of a down payment, you have more choices in lenders, which means more choices in products.

See the following link for more information on the new mortgage rules that are now in affect: http://www.fin.gc.ca/n11/11-003-eng.asp

17 Mar

General

Posted by: Nicole Wilford

I am very excited to be part of a company (Harbour View Mortgages) that gives back to the community. Check out the latest press release about our first “Great Payment Give a Way” winner! 

Press_Release.pdf